Live - Blue Man Group Rock Chicagoland With Complex Tour





That blue trio which just happens to pop up everywhere including commercials, music videos and even soundtracks, are in the middle of their first full production U.S. concert tour. Aided by production designer Marc Brickman, who is known for his work with Pink Floyd, NIN, and Paul McCartney, this tour features songs from Blue Man Groupís second album The Complex, which has been in stores since late April on Lava Records. Blue Man Group came to the Rosemont Theatre Saturday night with a full rock ensemble and attempted to show the people how rock concert movements should be executed. Concert movements were the theme of this show, and according to this production, it wants to push boundaries and influence other present and future concerts. Hmm, perhaps they are aiming for popular culture status.


Despite arriving a little late for the BMG, I approached an usher, who was sucked directly into the show, to be seated. For a minute I thought I'd be pulled up on stage since Blue Man Group shows are known for dragging people up on stage with poor punctuality. Loud neon lights, several musicians, and the silent but deadly Blue Man Group banged on self-created percussion instruments to emit an unusual signature emotion. Along with that came some trippy on-screen visuals which most likely contained many symbolic interpretations - like never wanting to work in a cubicle (you have to see it to understand). Tracy Bonham and Venus Hum, who opened up for BMG, made cameos on stage and performed a couple of songs with the latex-covered percussionists. Annette Strean of Venus Hum was rocking this cool lit up dress that was in syncopation with the stage lighting. Towards the end of the show, BMG and the musicians decided to actually see how "rock" they could actually be by busting out a cover of The Who's "Teenage Wasteland" with a little twist. BMG brought out some invented electronic tubed-up xylophones and set the melody for "Teenage Wasteland," and by the looks of the crowd, they were feeling the jam. They also had the crowd up from their seats and moving during rock concert movement #3 and #6 (again, you have to see it to understand). So, maybe Blue Man Group is worthy of being influential to the mainstream. Nevertheless, they are a proper installation of culture and abstract thought. If the boys in blue make it to your neck of the woods, it would be in your entertainment's best interests to make sure you see 'em.



Source: Sergio Flores

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Live - Blue Man Group Rock Chicagoland With Complex Tour