Wrath Of Circuits





When I received a copy of The Nein's new CD Wrath Of Circuits, I wasn't sure what to expect. The band name made me think of a German industrial act. Would you like to touch my monkey? Within the first few seconds of the opening track "Lost Sounds", my visions of Mike Meyers dancing as Deter were quickly put to rest. This band takes the danceable sound of Franz Ferdinand or The Rapture, and then smashes it with the sounds of Wire and Sonic Youth. It is an interesting blend of rock influences, which are amplified by the sonic wizardry of sound manipulator Dale Flattum (Steel Pole Bath Tub). Their angular guitars and catchy melodies will get the indie kids to dance, but the tunes are far from cheery. Lyrically, this record revolves around the theme of a fear of technology. "Foreign Friendster" serves up a near-perfect blend of fucked up keyboard loops, samples, and straight-up rock & roll. The group acknowledges their '80s mentors with "Courtesy Bows To New Wave". One of the strongest tracks is "The Vibe", combining the repetitive looping of what sounds like a kid's piano with a prog-rock track reminiscent of the latest offering from Oceansize. Always melodic yet abrasive, you can't help by nod along to their hypnotic pop. The Nein shows that it is fine to look back to the '80s for influences while still looking forward for new ideas on sounds and textures. Call them dance-punk or prog-new wave, but I wouldn't waste my time trying to label a band with such musical depth. I applaud any band that is capable of pushing new sonic boundaries while still making their audience dance along. Wrath Of Circuits shows a band that is destined to make waves in 2005.

The Nein
Sonic Unyon

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Wrath Of Circuits