The Repulsion Box





Damn I am sucker for accents. There is plenty more to Sons And Daughters' full-length, The Repulsion Box, but their Scottish accents are mighty fantastic. The quartet's unparalleled use of emotion was shown in their 2004 EP Love The Cup, which they have taken up a notch with their debut full-length album. This is a collection of songs that draws from panic, paranoia and lust, making for one of the most enjoyable albums of the year. One thing about Sons And Daughters that I love is that they are impossible to classify or pigeonhole. Parts folk, country, punk, indie rock, the list of possibilities goes on and on. The album explodes within the first few seconds of the opening track "Medicine", complete with some intense mandolin playing (yeah that's right... intense mandolin) with Scott Paterson and Adele Bethel's dueling vocals. Without giving you a second to catch your breath, the panic flips into an eerie feeling with "Red Receiver", during which we are introduced to Paterson's deeper vocal stylings, blending perfectly with Bethel's sultry voice. It is one sexy song, creepy but damn sexy. Other bands have tried to create this kind of mood, but nobody has pulled it off in recent memory like Sons And Daughters. The mood shifts to anger with "Hunt", as Bethel wails out "I'm innocent" over churning guitars and a driving, nearly tribal drumbeat. The mood doesn't lighten much with the first single off the album, "Dance Me In". Their brilliant use of rhythm builds up unbelievable amounts of tension in their music, evoking more emotion in a three minute track than most bands can accomplish in a full-length album. When she snarls the line "just dance me in", you feel as if you're going to get a whiskey bottle to the skull if you don't obey. "Taste The Girl" is the first real break in mood, giving the listener a chance to nod their head for a few minutes to one of the finest alt-pop songs you will hear this year. This is one of the few releases of 2005 that I have completely enjoyed from start to finish. If you could fill up a syringe with the darkest songs of Johnny Cash and Nick Cave and inject the concoction into four talented Scottish musicians, you'd get Sons And Daughters.

Sons And Daughters
Domino

Posted:
The Repulsion Box