Everybody Rise





The Makers are an important, passionate group still dripping with vitality after over a decade of music making. The Makers over the top attitude and uncanny stage presence has inspired greats such as The Hives and the Mooney Suzuki. As a freshman in high school, the Makers became one of those quintessential bands that helped me shape my own identity as a rebellious teenager. At 16, I would hang out at band practice, drinking cans of Milwaukee's Best and staring at pictures of Michael Maker poured across the covers of albums like Hunger, Psychopathia Sexualis, and Sympathy with April March. After extensive touring across the world and the release of their ninth full-length, it would seem that there isn't anything The Makers aren't capable of pulling off. And yet with the recent rise in mainstream popularity of garage rock acts like Jet (and I use the term garage rock loosely), I have to ask when will the greats of this genre be truly recognized for their contributions? If The Makers didn't prove the magnitude of their abilities with the release of Rock Star God, then they certainly have with Everybody Rise. Again we are reintroduced to elements of the Stones meets The Stooges, but there is something else that comes across in the recording. Subtle tracks like "Ordinary Human" or "Promises For Tomorrow" exhibit a new sense of sophistication. A certain depth is achieved on Everybody Rise that has advanced the band a long in their mission to take over the world. The album was masterfully recorded with the aid of Jack Endino and leaves me craving the thrill of a live performance.

The Makers
Kill Rock Stars

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Everybody Rise