Ghetto Palms: Tempa Riddim / Tropical Sounds

First off, one minor correction from last week: Selector JD from Deadly Dragon correctly and annoyingly pointed out that the Stone Love throwback riddim that I listed as “I Do Love You”--after the Heptones classic Shinehead covers on his white label version--is actually “Rocksteady,” originally by Alton Ellis. Whatever. In the interests of science, it’s actually the bass and drums from “Rocksteady” and the horns from the “M16” riddim aka the Uniques’ “Secretly” but nobody cares.

Anyway, he more than compensated for that shit by putting me up on a brand new tune from everybody’s favorite Bermudan Collie Buddz, which inspired this week’s first blend. The 45 is an evil combination between Collie and his idol (he told me this) Bounty Killa on a riddim that sounds like a mash up of the Carmina Burana chords from Nas’ “Hate Me Now” and the “Tempa” bassline. It seemed like a good excuse to run both some of my favorite under-utilized Collie tunes and some definitive joints on the “Tempa.”

Collie Buddz/Tempa blend:

“Sensimilla” – Collie Buddz ft. Roachekilla

“Love Deh” – Collie Buddz

“Never Snitch” – Collie Buddz & Bounty Killa

“Tempa” riddim:

“Short Temper” – Michael Rose

“Tempa” – Anthony Red Rose

Tropical blend:

“Uhuhahaha Cumbia” – Oro11

“Chilombo” (extended remix) – Esau Mwamwaya/Radioclit

“Mangalena’s Turning Me On” – Sergio Mendes vs Black Chiney Soundsystem

“Dandara” – Gilberto Gil

This column won’t always be one slow and one fast mix but it’s a convenient format for the moment and this 2nd blend kinda embodies what I really want to do with this thing, i.e. follow the tributaries of soundsystem culture where they bleed into all the other super-tropicanical madness that’s going on in the world right now as fruity loops and samplers generally find their way into the wrong hands. Case in point is this track by Buenos Aires via SF DJ Oro11, a transposition of the Art Of Noise synth-pop gem “Moments In Love” into a raw cumbia beat that may be the toughest thing I’ve ever heard. Makes you want to write a movie script about 80s gangsters moving drugs and money back and forth on the Detroit-Miami-Colombia pipeline just so this could be on the soundtrack. It also makes a nice intro to the UK afropop of Esau Mwamwaya’s “Chilombo,” presented here in a extra-duty extended version over the “Scoobay” riddim. Whoever makes Ape Blends must have had a similar idea with the reverse-engineered baile funk of Sergio Mendes over Black Chiney’s Kopa riddim, a track I play out all the time, whether people get it or not. Last is my personal joint from one of my favorite revolutionary movies Quilombo. The Gilberto Gil soundtrack is the kind of record you can find at Tropicalia in Furs if you’re fortunate enough to live in New York, or is probably just laying around in stacks at garage sales if you’re fortunate enough to live in Bahia.

Ghetto Palms: Tempa Riddim / Tropical Sounds