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Boogie Lets Go Of A Lost Love In “Two Days”

Boogie addresses the highs and lows that come with being a rapper on the come up.

October 12, 2016
Boogie Lets Go Of A Lost Love In “Two Days” Nathaniel Wood

Compton rapper Boogie isn’t afraid to speak from the heart. With his new project Thirst 48 Pt. II on the way, the 26-year-old rapper isn’t holding back on what it takes to confront the ups and downs that come with being a music artist on the ascent. For him, that includes getting used to utilizing social media, letting go of a long-term relationship, and raising a son all at once.

In his newest single “Two Days,” Boogie addresses the rocky partnership with his on-and-off girlfriend and best friend. Over the phone, the fresh-faced rapper talked to The FADER about how their connection served as inspiration for the new track.

“In the first tape, I introduced these feelings I had for my best friend; that whole tape was me going through that whole thing with her because I felt like finally starting a relationship,” Boogie said. “Three years later, we still going through the same shit. We broke up around the time of the tape, so it was more so me talking about how I haven’t talked to her, and relationship problems.”

Check for more of our conversation with Boogie, and peep the video premiere of "Two Days" below.



Can you recall the moment when you realized that making music was something that you absolutely had to do?

That happened in church. When I was a kid, about 15 years old; I was singing in the choir. While I was singing in church I was also getting into trouble at school. The choir really inspired me, and I just fell in love with music.

What were you thinking while developing Thirst 48 Pt. II?

I know on the first tape I was talking about how everybody else was thirsty and I really didn’t feel like I opened as much as I could have. This time it’s more focused around my flaws. This time around I really open up about a lot of stuff.

What’s your message behind the track “Two Days”?

In the first tape, I introduced these feelings I had for my best friend; that whole tape was me going through that whole thing with her because I felt like finally starting a relationship. Three years later, we still going through the same shit. We broke up around the time of the tape so it was more so me talking about how I haven’t talked to her, and relationship problems.

You seem very in touch with your feelings. Have you always been able to openly express how you’re feeling?

It’s a lack of my dad not being around, I just had my momma so I think I’m just a real sensitive dude, in all honesty.

How does having a child motivate your career?

I’m single in the sense that my kid’s mother and me aren’t together, but she’s very prominent; she’s in the picture for sure. It’s just tough when I’m on the road because I’m so used to being able to get home when I want to be. When he’s going through things I know I need to be there, but when I’m on the road I can’t do that and FaceTime can only do so much, because I see it in his face he’s not listening. It’s tough.

Is there a difference between you and your rap persona?

I don’t even think I know how to do the two. All I know how to talk about is the stuff I’m going through in my regular life. I think I need to get better at opening up in real life, I think I opened up so much in my music it’s messing up my social skills. I’m working on that now.

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When you’re back home and off the road, do you ever feel distracted by things going on around you?

When I got signed and I moved to Burbank I thought all those problems — like Compton and all the little childish stuff — was all going to go away, but it escalated more. People started calling me fake and stuff, and I’m such a practical person. I feel like I got to respond to everybody who says something about me that I grew up with. It’s just tough because everybody expects so much from you and you’re not even at the place you want to be in life either, and they think you’re at a certain place that you’re not really at. It’s just a different animal now.

A lot of Thirst 48 was about how this generation is thirsty on social media. How do you separate yourself from social media, especially in this industry?

I’m not even good at it yet. I get pressed by my fans all the time about how I need to tweet more or post more pictures or say something funny on Twitter. But shit, I’ll just be like, “If I ain’t got nothing to say that I feel is important, I’m not gonna tweet it.” I have to figure out a balance because I know it’s a business at the end of the day. I still gotta promote myself and do shit a certain way. I suck at social media, though.

What is the best piece of advice that you’ve gotten about how to create good music?

It was from my producer, six years ago. I was in a super rapping Lil Wayne phase and I don’t think I knew myself; it’s just because I grew up off Lil Wayne. And my producer told me I need to stop, be myself, and I need to actually talk about stuff. I was mad at him for like the year. I didn’t talk to him, but then I realized he was right. That was probably the best advice I ever got — be yourself.

Boogie Lets Go Of A Lost Love In “Two Days”