People Streamed More Music Per Day In 2016 Than They Downloaded All Year

A new year-end report shows subscription-based streaming consumption skyrocketed this year.

January 03, 2017
People Streamed More Music Per Day In 2016 Than They Downloaded All Year Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Pitchfork points to a new report from BuzzAngle Music which declares 2016 a year of major growth in the music industry, particularly in terms of streaming consumption.

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The report specifically cites subscription-based streaming services as an area of growth, with the overall number of subscription streams in 2016 more than doubling the amount recorded in 2015. In total, subscription-based listens apparently made up 76% of overall streaming in 2016, as opposed to 62% in 2015.

Streaming services are "providing the industry with a great business model," says BuzzAngle, contrasting those figures with a comparatively flat year for music sales and downloads. The report notes that the average volume of songs streamed per day by users was around 1.2 billion songs, almost doubling the total number of songs sold all year, 734 million.

BuzzAngle also says that "streaming services offer music lovers a much wider selection of music at their fingertips," claiming that over 28 million unique songs were streamed this year, as compared to 7 million purchased. Overall, the report concludes, "More music is being listened to by more people than ever before."

Read the full report here.

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People Streamed More Music Per Day In 2016 Than They Downloaded All Year