13 Songs You Need In Your Life This Week

Tracks we love right now, and why they matter. In no particular order.

1. Kehlani, "How That Taste"

Any R&B singer worth their salt in 2015 has to have at least one song in their repertoire addressing the haters, real or mythical. On "How That Taste," Kehlani does uiceust that. Over a synth-driven track produced by Jahaan Sweet, the Bay Area rising star cheekily calls out the bandwagoners who want a piece of her now: They didn't want me then, they want me now / Did not want me to win, but now they proud / Now they paying to get in, they in the crowd / Tell me how's it feel now? Fair question, imo. — Rawiya Kameir

1. Kehlani, "How That Taste"
2. Juiceboxxx, "Like A Maniac"

I guess I live under a rock because this is the first Juiceboxxx video I ever knew about, despite his releasing music and touring for over a decade. The style of that music is: rap-rock. I clicked on it thanks to a tweet by Leon Neyfakh, who wrote our Migos cover story. At first, I felt more curiosity than connection, but Leon also happens to be publishing a book about Juiceboxxx—an entire book—so I read an excerpt and decided to watch again. I have to say, lyrics like This is my life and I can't go back definitely resonated more after I was clued in to the dude's whole deal: years of cool ideas and low-budget tours that increasingly seem like they'll never add up to an audience big enough to sustain a life beyond the interminable grind. Now the self-doubt in "Like a Maniac" seems valid and relatable; he's not giving up but maybe doesn't know why not. I feel silly that I didn't "get it" without a little more context, because of course I feel the same way. In the two days since, Juiceboxxx is all I listen to. — Duncan Cooper

2. Juiceboxxx, "Like A Maniac"
3. Krept & Konan f. Rick Ross, "Certified"

The pollination between U.S. street rap and U.K. grime continues, with Rick Ross hopping on London duo Krept & Konan's lurcher "Certified." Like much rap from a foreign place, it's aesthetically two or three or so years behind, and would fit snuggly between "House Party" and "Stay Scheming" during the early hours of your next pregame. Which is to say it's fun as fuck; K&K rap about World Star vines, Rozay raps about Scotland Yard, and we all win. — Matthew Trammell

3. Krept & Konan f. Rick Ross, "Certified"
4. Johnny Jewel f. Saorsie Ronan, "Tell Me"

Ryan Gosling's directorial debut, Lost River, has gotten a lot of bad reviews. Chromatics mastermind Johnny Jewel called the Detroit-set film a sort of "dark Goonies," though, and that description—plus the original music Jewel himself composed for the movie—is probably enough to get me to at least watch the thing. The soundtrack's opener, "Tell Me," is a haunting little lullaby sung by actress Saorsie Ronan. According to Jewel's SoundCloud description, Ronan's Lost River character, Kat, sings the song to herself every night as "a way of dealing with the pain of her surroundings." The twinkling production is minimal, and the lyrics are sweet, like a song you'd make up yourself: Tell me I'm your baby and you'll never leave me. It's a song for teenage dreamers, the kind who are hopelessly optimistic and fixated on forever. — Patrick D. McDermott

4. Johnny Jewel f. Saorsie Ronan, "Tell Me"
5. Georgia, "Move Systems"

Georgia isn't new to FADER, but "Move Systems" is the first time the London-based drummer/producer/singer's come to my attention, and I can't stop listening. The new single, inaugurating Georgia's recent Domino signing, provokes a few instant snap comparisons —M.I.A. behind a drumkit, a British tUnE-yArDs—but Georgia's rapid-fire delivery and rolling percussive madness feels totally fresh, too, like something that defies hybrids. — Larry Fitzmaurice

5. Georgia, "Move Systems"
6. Speedy Ortiz, “Puffer”

Out of the tracks released from Foil Deer, the sophomore full-length from Speedy Ortiz, "Puffer" probably sounds the furthest removed from the live-sounding indie that we heard on Major Arcana, the four-piece's debut record. It's filled with the kinds of processed vocals and slinky, detail-oriented textures that you'd normally associate with pop music. But it also features some of the band's more distinguishable calling cards: catchy hooks, clever phrasing, knotted guitars. It might not sound homemade, but it still sounds like Speedy. —Patrick D. McDermott

6. Speedy Ortiz, “Puffer”
7. BeatKing, “Stopped”

Houston's self-proclaimed Club God BeatKing lightens the mood on his knuckly, ratchet trap anthem "Stopped" with riotous ad-libs like that saaaallty and unforgettable (if largely offensive) cracks like pussy bored like Hobby Lobby. It's all 808's and LOLs, and we plan on listening to this all the way turned up until summer shows up. — Zara Golden

7. BeatKing, “Stopped”
8. Icarus, "Cassia"

In the late '90s and rolling into the 2000s, there were few DJs bigger than progressive house dons Sasha and Digweed. The UK duo's mixes—in the club and on record—were all about the "journey," blending swathes of instrumental productions into a seamless stream of peaks and troughs that was perfect for getting lost in on the dancefloor. After a decade out in the cold, it seems Bristol, UK duo Icarus are grabbing the prog-house baton. To ears that are more accustomed to electronic music's tougher edges, their single "Cassia" on Pete Tong's FFRR label is gonna sound like silk: it flows and it flutters, it rolls and it rises. Tell me you don't wanna party after hearing this. — Ruth Saxelby

8. Icarus, "Cassia"
9. Donmonique, “Pilates (Kendall, Kylie, Miley)”

20-year-old DonMonique from East New York's takes barely-there production and a laconic delivery and makes the work stretch in a very real way on her wholly satisfying and dangerously addictive "Pilates (Kendall, Kylie, Miley)." In addition to those mentioned in the title, she name-checks the likes of Tyga, Chynna, Drizzy, Wayne, Nicki; she's also got Awful Records' Father and RichPoSlim join her in the song's accompanying video. For something that almost isn't, the song's actually kind of potent. — Zara Golden

9. Donmonique, “Pilates (Kendall, Kylie, Miley)”
10. Toro Y Moi, "Run Baby Run"

Toro y Moi is back, just in time for the big thaw. "Run Baby Run," the third song released from his forthcoming album, sounds like the first warm bike ride of the season. As ever, he finds inspiration in gentle, atmospheric pop—this time around sounding like a baby Beach Boy. Run baby run / You've got so many things to do / Sleep while you can / 'Cause tomorrow will not feel new, he sings, encouragingly. — Rawiya Kameir

10. Toro Y Moi, "Run Baby Run"
11. ​Hot Chip, "Need You Now"

When I first listened to the band's excellent forthcoming LP, I figured that the euphoric vocal-house cut "Need You Now" wouldn't get single treatment—but it has, and it certainly deserves it. A winsome, sad-eyed cut reminiscent of The Warning's "Boy From School," it's just the latest reminder of why Hot Chip have gained the reputation as Britain's greatest dance group since Pet Shop Boys, full stop. — Larry Fitzmaurice

11. ​Hot Chip, "Need You Now"
12. Nozinja, "Xihukwani"

Way back in 2010, Honest Jon's released Shangaan Electro, an entrancing compilation of "New Wave Dance Music From South Africa" that included some seriously intense BPMs. Nozinja is pretty much the face of the shangaan sound, and I've been dying for more material from him ever since. Thankfully, his debut LP's out in June via Warp, and this tart, exquisitely wavy new single feels like the perfect thing for spring. — Larry Fitzmaurice

12. Nozinja, "Xihukwani"
13. Anna B Savage, "II"

The crippling nature of low self-esteem seems to be at the heart of London singer/songwriter Anna B Savage's second single "II." Yet while her thoughts scatter from skipping showers every other day to I will never amount to anything, her voice stands proud. There's a weight and elegance to her words that demands you both hear her and respect her. Then a lovely Wild Beasts-esque swell skips the song into double time, as Savage insists she'll make you proud. Perched next to her debut single, it spells the start of something special. — Ruth Saxelby

13. Anna B Savage, "II"
13 Songs You Need In Your Life This Week